Should Companies Pay To Train Employees on Leadership?

Is it valid? Is there an ROI? How do you vet a trainer? Here’s how to figure all that out

Joe Procopio
5 min readApr 9, 2020

Like a lot of trends in business, leadership training isn’t new, but it’s suddenly hot.

I’ve been founding and working at startups for over 20 years, and I’ve spent over half of that time as a formal and informal advisor to other startups. While all companies have a need for experienced advisors, startups tend to need them more than most. While their leadership might have a lot of talent, they sometimes don’t have a lot of experience navigating every scenario that could make or break their fragile company.

For a company that’s more mature — let’s say your standard Fortune 500 stalwart — there’s usually at least a layer or two of upper management with plenty of leadership experience, for what that’s worth.

I’ve recently gotten more inbound from folks who want to sell this new brand of leadership training — coaches, trainers, or mentors on demand — and it’s on this side that I discovered some of the reasoning behind leadership as a desired employee skill. Some of these trainers are really sharp, with extensive leadership in their background, and are committed to doing leadership training right, not just hosting a motivational…

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Joe Procopio

I'm a multi-exit, multi-failure entrepreneur. NLG pioneer. Building TeachingStartup.com & GROWERS. Write at Inc.com and BuiltIn.com. More at joeprocopio.com