How to Build a Low-Code Startup Around Your MVP

You don’t have to spend a fortune to build out your company, yet

Joe Procopio

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Why do some successful startups scale smoothly while others flail and eventually fail?

In the early days of any company — the Minimum Viable Product days — it’s a miracle just to get a working version of your product into a customer’s hands.

So what happens when you eventually wind up delivering a lot of product to a lot of customers — but you’re still recording all your information on sticky notes?

Or whatever the 2020s equivalent of a sticky note might be?

When I founded my first startup 20 years ago, one of the first things I did was build a custom system to keep track of every data point of my business. Today, I can accomplish the same thing, but automate the capture and aggregation of data with Low-Code options. This means I no longer need to spend dozens of hours reinventing wheels when I should be spending that time building a better product and selling more of it.

You don’t have to build a proprietary system or spend a fortune on SaaS solutions in order to scale. Not yet.

Here’s how to get started with Low-Code options for tracking the most important growth aspects of your business.

First: Why you need to track the growth of your business

It’s never been easier to start a company, and it’s never been easier to create a working product or market a new service. The options for building a sustainable business are nearly unlimited.

But that lowering-of-the-bar comes with a downside — I see a lot of newly-formed companies skipping those sustainability options altogether.

In fact, I recently polled my Teaching Startup entrepreneurs about how they were monitoring the health of their business. These are serious, revenue-generating, early-to-growth-phase entrepreneurs, and their answers, on the scale from most ideal to least, was not as ideal as I would have assumed.

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Joe Procopio

I'm a multi-exit, multi-failure entrepreneur. NLG pioneer. Building TeachingStartup.com & GROWERS. Write at Inc.com and BuiltIn.com. More at joeprocopio.com