His Startup’s Sales Goal Was $1 Million, But He Couldn’t Crack $1,000

How hockey stick growth expectations get in the way of goals

Joe Procopio

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It’s a phenomenon that happens to a lot of startup founders and leaders. It definitely happened to an entrepreneur I’ll call “Jeff,” who reached out to me a couple weeks ago.

Jeff is a repeat founder, now in the early stages helming his second startup, after exiting his first through a particularly lucrative acqui-hire (that’s where a company buys a startup solely for its talent). While the previous exit was good for Jeff and his team, it was also part of the current problem.

See, Jeff’s first startup had achieved an uncommon level of success rather quickly. During his first startup’s meteoric rise, Jeff got an acquisition offer that he couldn’t refuse. He took it. In retrospect, he believes it was the right choice and I, for one, agree.

Fast forward to today, and Jeff is attempting something that rarely happens in the world of startups: Doing the same thing and expecting the same results.

This time around, the results weren’t coming. A year into his new venture, Jeff’s plan for $1 million in annual revenue had come up short. About $999,000 short. He hadn’t cleared $1,000 in sales yet.

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Joe Procopio

I'm a multi-exit, multi-failure entrepreneur. NLG pioneer. Building TeachingStartup.com & GROWERS. Write at Inc.com and BuiltIn.com. More at joeprocopio.com