Here’s What Startups Should Do Instead of Asking For an Expert Review

A random review will get you exactly what you pay for, or worse

Joe Procopio

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I’ve dedicated a chunk of the last 10 years of my career to helping entrepreneurs both new and experienced get a better handle on their business. So I want to make sure you know that this post isn’t about me; it’s about helping you.

When random entrepreneurs ask me for help, I do my best, but physical, temporal, and legal limitations kind of put me in a box. I have a project going to address a larger and broader need for startup help (more on that later and please try that first), but even when I do get personally involved, which is rare, I’ll only answer direct questions.

I’m a working entrepreneur and a formal advisor to several companies, so that helps me prioritize my spare time. Direct questions also help me stay away from making assumptions or trying to guess what the entrepreneur needs.

But like I said, this isn’t about me. It’s about helping you.

So when those same random entrepreneurs ask me to review their product, their company, their deck, or their business model, I give them a polite but flat refusal.

Here are the reasons why you shouldn’t ask for a quick review, and what to do…

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Joe Procopio

I'm a multi-exit, multi-failure entrepreneur. NLG pioneer. Building TeachingStartup.com & GROWERS. Write at Inc.com and BuiltIn.com. More at joeprocopio.com