Good points, Benek, I understand where you’re coming from and you’re not wrong — but let’s look at it from the POV of the expert. If you’re an independent expert, and you can fill a solid, steady work week for a solid steady year, every year, with static demand from a static, deep-pocketed customer base, bless you, you’ve achieved greatness.

I’ve been there. I was both a solo and then founded and ran a consulting firm of experts for years. Most demand for services isn’t like this. It’s feast and famine. Even for the top level provider range of any service. Clients turn over, client work gets thin, demand gets lumpy — expert has to spend a good chunk of their billable time networking, finding new clients, marketing themselves, selling themselves, closing new deals, replacing demand.

A freelancer marketplace is not an E2SM, not an evolved one anyway. Those places you mention both suffer from the exact problems I wrote about in the post. They’re full of bogus experts.

An E2SM is more like the digital version of a traditional firm. But where that firm takes a 40–60% cut of the billable revenue, or more, the digital version takes much less, and provides the same or better amenities. I’ll get more into how to attract true expert professionals in my third and final post on the topic, which has to do with value added on both sides — providers and customers.

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I’m a multi-exit, multi-failure entrepreneur. Building Precision Fermentation & Teaching Startup. Sold Automated Insights & ExitEvent. More at joeprocopio.com

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